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Two More Fake Websites

Brian Austin
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To confirm, there is only one InternetTIPS.com website, this one, written and created by me, Brian Austin. All other active versions that you may see online are fake and have no relationship with InternetTIPS.com or me. That's why occasionally, here at InternetTIPS.com, we like to poke around the web to determine who is copying our information, or impersonating us online.


How To Be Sure You're Visiting InternetTIPS.com

To be sure you're visiting the one and only, authentic InternetTIPS.com:

  • Simply type internettips.com into your web browser address bar / box and choose your ENTER or RETURN key.
  • To further protect visitors, InternetTIPS.com also uses encryption, so you'll see the "s" in the web address: https://www.internettips.com.
  • Moreover, you can choose the "Secure Site Verification" seal currently situated at the bottom of every web page on our website. 

Now let's deal with these latest "fake" websites.

At the time of writing, below are two such "fake" websites that are not in any way related to InternetTIPS.com.

Fake Facebook Website

www.facebook.com/InternetTipscom-166014507077211/

Facebook say that the user of the "fake" website above is not breaking their rules.

You may not be surprised to learn that I no longer use Facebook, so can't know for sure what is being said or promoted on the "fake" Facebook website above.

Moreover, the "fake" Facebook website above may have been up and running for years. Does Facebook care? I have no idea.

You may reasonably ask, "Surely, Facebook doesn't allow 'fake' content"? :-)

The answer that dear reader, is for you to decide.

However, in fairness to Facebook:

  • Sometimes, problems like these are simply not important enough for Facebook to take action.
  • Or, Facebook staff may simply not be trained sufficiently to deal with such issues that arise.
  • Or websites that impersonate others may not be viewed by Facebook as a problem to Facebook.
  • Some challenges are simply too hard for Facebook to resolve.
  • Alternatively, a Facebook representative may simply agree that anyone can create a new Facebook page and pretend they are InternetTIPS.com. If yes, does that mean anyone is free on Facebook to impersonate any company or individual they may choose?

What do you think?

Though I wonder what would happen if you tried to use Facebook page names such as any of the following:

  • www.facebook.com/Google-166014507077211/
  • www.facebook.com/BBCcom-166014507077211/
  • www.facebook.com/BBCcouk-166014507077211/
  • www.facebook.com/TheGuardian-166014507077211/
  • www.facebook.com/Reuters-166014507077211/

My best guess is that Facebook set-up design routines simply wouldn't let you set up an account using a well known brand. Perhaps If you tried, and to start with, your new "Facebook test account" or page would be shut down soon after. But, if you're a Facebook user who wants to give it a go - let me know how you get on.

So dear reader, I wonder, does that mean if you have lots of corporate muscle, or deep financial "pockets", your "brand" is automatically protected by Facebook?

However, if like InternetTIPS.com, you're a small "insignificant" company, or a standalone blogger, are you "on your own" when attempting to deal with such issues? 

I don't know the answer to any of those questions, only that I'm not overly interested in talking further with Facebook.

My benchmark for evaluating quality both in business and in life follows a simple two-step guideline:

  • Ignore what a company or organisation says. Why: words are easy; those can simply be lies. 
  • Only action determines true behaviour or quality of service. While words are indeed wonderful tools, trust is only earned through follow-up, matching demonstrable actions.

If by some miracle or stroke of good fortune, Facebook do decide to remove the "fake" page above, then dear reader, finally InternetTIPS.com visitors won't be further confused. Moreover, we too can then thank Facebook for finally addressing the issue. In the meantime, we laugh a little at such absurdities and let the world go on as it will. 

At present however, and from past experience, we feel as though we have about as much influence as a mosquito flying around the rear end of a dinosaur. However, we have faith in the force of the light side (whatever that may be).

Fake Google Sites Website

Now to our second "fake" website. While I wasn't especially surprised by the "fake" Facebook website above, the second "fake" website below did indeed cause my eyes widen with amazement.

Why: using past experiences as a guide, I've always thought that Google would already have a remarkably smart detection system in place:

https://sites.google.com/site/wwwinternettipscom

Though hardly worth much attention, the "fake" Google Sites website above seemed to suddenly appear more recently. I've contacted Google and am awaiting the outcome.

What Action To Take If You Have Been Scammed Or Duped By A "Fake" Website

You have my heartfelt sympathies!

Our two example fake websites above are almost silly in comparison to some dreadful experiences some authentic website owners have to endure, when the fake websites cause absolute havoc to small business owners striving to earn their living online legally. 

So in the first instance, you should contact the website source provider. So for the two examples above, Facebook and Google could and should help you.

Often, Facebook and Google may include "Report Abuse" links that you can use to send an alert.

The Google alleged abuse reporting process seems quick, easy, straightforward.

In contrast, to-date, Facebook however, tend to make the alleged abuse reporting process far more burdensome - unless you're reporting about the legal issues that are strongly related to the laws within your country - or for which, if not addressed quickly, may result in Facebook receiving huge fines.

Moreover, if you too would like to also report the two "fake" website links above, a big thank you for helping to keep the web just a little safer for us all. The moral dear reader is, if we don't help police our own world, no one else is going to do the job for us. We can recall that wonderful saying: "It it is to be, it is up to me".

In the meantime, due to ever growing list of complaints, one of my "governmental spies" tells me that the UK government is also taking a special interest in these areas. Thank you Mr. X. Time will tell what that means. 

Internet Tips From A Mosquito

Yes, mosquitos are small, however, they can get attention. So in celebrating the spirit of smallness, my additional tips for you to consider include:

  • Small is beautiful. Small is powerful.
  • Each of us has as much right as anyone else alive, to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.
  • Do not be intimidated by large organisations. If you think their process for dealing with an issue is flawed, or overly cumbersome, reject the process, choose a different route - your method (just don't break the laws of your land).
  • Pick your battles carefully. Some are simply not worthy of your time or energy.
  • Large companies must learn that respect is only truly earned through doing the right thing.

Finally, while "fake" websites exist, be careful online.


Please note: in the article above especially (though not exclusively), we know the word "fake" can have different interpretations, so here we define the word "fake" to mean one party impersonating another.